Videos

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Gateway Portals to the City: Infrastructure for Sustainable Urbanization

H.E. Mr. Peter Thomson, President, United Nations General Assembly attended and speech

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

GC 26 Closing Ceremony - English Language

Streamed live on 12th May 2017

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

GC 26 URBAN TALK

Streamed live on 9th May 2017

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

Global Urban Lectures, Fernando Murillo - A Compass for Cities

In this lecture Fernando Murillo from University of Buenos Aires discusses the “Compass” of cities – a participatory methodology for policy making . It consists of different indicators represented graphically as a “Compass”, combining four fundamental dimensions dealing with the progressive fulfilment of human rights.

SYNOPSIS

Issues which the lecture addresses
This lecture addresses city planning challenges in urban planning practice, in relation to the implementation of the New Urban Agenda:

a) Progressive fulfilment of human rights with focus on informal settlements – shifting from eviction and massive regularisation to city-wide informal settlement upgrading and prevention;

b) Participation – moving away from public participation towards community self organization and engagement;

c) Public works – reacting to social, environmental and economic needs for more proactive and problem preventive approaches focused on infrastructure and

d) Regulatory frameworks – changing from land use and density rigid zoning towards  pro-poor land market regulations using different land tenure systems.

Why a “Compass”?: Taking into account the challenges presented above, the lecture advocates for the need to reconcile the formal and informal city planning process, carried out by local governments and communities. The lecture discusses application cases in different scales where the participatory planning methodology was applied.

a) Informal settlement upgrade in a metropolitan area of Buenos Aires;

b) City-wide upgrade prevention in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Cochabamba, Bolivia and Suacha, at the outskirt of Bogotá, Colombia;

c) National habitat strategy, the case of high concentration of displaced populations in Kigali, Rwanda;

d) Post conflict planning, designing re-housing projects in Khan Younis, the Gaza Strip, Autonomous Palestinian Territories.

Short analysis of the above issues
Some lessons learnt from the experience highlight the relevance of community self-organization to implement the new urban agenda; the critical importance of linking community and governmental planning exercises to support a progressive fulfilment of their basic human rights; the need for acting simultaneously in multiple scales with a participatory, preventive and resilient approach.

The “Compass” contribute a methodology for participatory planning whose application in different contexts has served to review public policies. So far, results have been encouraging and motivate innovative planning approaches at municipal level, to enable low income neighbours adopting a community approach to address social and environmental problems. Linkages between these process with local authorities have lead to the development of new urban planning regulatory frameworks and public works with successful results indicating the potential of community participation and self-organization overcoming difficulties hard to address by traditional planning approaches dominated by governmental interventions.

Community involvement in public plans results in a very pro-active and preventive urban agenda of recovering public spaces by the people; upgrading slums and recovering social housing by associating public resources and self-organized groups, as well as early recovery strategies carried out by refugees designing their own habitat according to their specific needs.

Propositions for addressing the issue
The “Compass” of cities is a participatory methodology for policy making seeking progressive fulfilment of human rights. It consists of different indicators represented graphically as a “Compass”, combining four fundamental dimensions: Human rights fulfilment, community organization, public works and regulatory frameworks. Each of these dimension measures the same basic habitat needs for land tenure and housing, infrastructure (wat-san), social services (education-health), mobility (public transport) and sustainability (income generation opportunities, disaster risk reduction, etc).

The graph of the compass summarizes the status of human rights in a certain area, resulting of their social organization, public works and regulatory framework success. This contributes to build up a vision for slum upgrading and prevention through participation of their inhabitants, local governments and private sector. It facilitates quick collection of essential and update information for planning purposes through key informants facilitating the understanding and agreement on the most convenient way forward to tackle down informal settlements problems and creation trends.

So far, the instrument has been applied to 25 municipalities from different countries in Latin America, guiding discussion and actions towards negotiated interventions. A coordination team receives periodic reports from teams applying the method in other cities, providing online guidance. This lecture presents comparative research, identifying lessons learnt obtained by the experience applying the methodology in different cities, contexts and scales.

BIOGRAPHY

Fernando Murillo is an architect with a master degree and a Phd in architecture and urban planning. His professional career combines academic activities as lecturer and director of a research program at the University of Buenos Aires with international projects in the field of urban planning, housing and settlement upgrading.

His work contributes to different governments and UN agencies, mostly UN Habitat, in Sudan and South Sudan, building public housing with environmentally friendly technologies and strategic urban planning; UNHCR, building 15,000 shelters for returnees and displaced populations, UNRWA, 12000 housing units for refugees in Gaza Strip and UNDP, developing local government plans in Colombia, Nicaragua, and schools in El Salvador. With World Bank in Zambia he prepares a local integration plan for former refugees eligible for citizenship.

With his interdisciplinary team he developed multiple participatory territorial planning tools to help local governments and communities to work out an integrated and inclusive urbanization strategy with a focus on progressive human rights fulfillment and sustainable development, such as the “Compass” disseminated internationally.

Recently, he founded an international network to analyze the impact of migrant corridors on the phenomena of rapid urbanization, called “Migraplan”.

Source: UN-Habitat

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat. 

HP Megatrends

Global socio-economic, demographic and technological forces which HP calls Megatrends will have a sustained and transformative impact on businesses, societies, economies, cultures and our personal lives in unimaginable ways in the years to come. 

In the next 15 years we will experience more change than in all of history to date. Undertsanding Megatrends can help guide how we maneuver this great wave of change, and inform our technology choices of the future, what innovations will be required, and what new business models will be needed.

Source: youtube.com

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

ILSI RF: Urbanization and USAID’s Value Chain Approach for Rural Economic... (Dr. Peter Richards)
Published on 10 Feb 2017

ILSI Research Foundation Scientific Session 2017
Hungry Cities: The Global Revolution in Food Systems

Dr. Peter Richards, US Agency for International Development (USAID)
Urbanization and USAID’s Value Chain Approach for Rural Economic Growth

On January 23, 2017, the ILSI Research Foundation organized a scientific session entitled Hungry Cities: The Global Revolution in Food System. The session explored drivers of food choice in low and middle income countries, with presentations from experts who shared their research and perspectives on how we may address this global revolution in food systems. 

Dr. Peter Richards, USAID, presented on Urbanization and USAID’s Value Chain Approach for Rural Economic Growth. 

In lower and middle income countries, family purchasing power has risen significantly over the past decade and a half. Population shifts, including rural to urban migration and the rapid rise of cities, have also reshaped market structures, particularly for agriculture and food. These changes are creating tremendous new opportunities (and challenges) for rural areas. The US government’s Feed the Future initiative, in recognition of these changes, emphasizes a market-driven, value chain approach to rural economic development. This includes not only working across the extent of the supply chain, but an increased emphasis on (1) developing farm level technical and financial capacities, particularly for high value dairy, meat, and horticultural production; (2) increasing awareness and recognition of product standards, to ensure safety and facilitate downstream processing; and (3) enabling efficient documentary and regulatory environments favorable to small and medium agri-food enterprises.

For more information about the ILSI Research Foundation, please visit: www.ilsirf.org

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

ILSI RF: Urbanization, Food Systems and the Diet Transformation in Dev ... (Dr. David Tschirley)
Published on 10 Feb 2017

ILSI Research Foundation Scientific Session 2017
Hungry Cities: The Global Revolution in Food Systems

Dr. David Tschirley, Michigan State University
Urbanization, Food Systems and the Diet Transformation in Developing Countries: What do we know, and what do we need to know?

On January 23, 2017, the ILSI Research Foundation organized a scientific session entitled Hungry Cities: The Global Revolution in Food System. The session explored drivers of food choice in low and middle income countries, with presentations from experts who shared their research and perspectives on how we may address this global revolution in food systems. 

Dr. David Tschirley, Michigan State University, presented the keynote on Urbanization, Food Systems and the Diet Transformation in Developing Countries: What do we know, and what do we need to know?

Research over the past several years has begun to document a rapidly unfolding diet transformation across developing Africa and Asia, driven by income growth and urbanization. Beyond the broad patterns of this transformation, the most notable finding is that the transformation is not limited to middle class and higher households in urban areas - these patterns are seen in rural areas as well as urban, and among low income households as well as those higher in the income distribution. This finding suggests that enormous pressures of change are being felt now in agrifood systems as they attempt to respond to this rapidly rising and changing demand for food. The presentation will review what is known about the process of change, and what needs to be known in order for governments and donors to develop effective policy and programmatic responses to this diet transformation. The talk will focus especially on the “hidden middle” of the systems – the processing, logistics, and wholesaling operations that tend to be overlooked by both researchers and policy makers but whose performance is central to the effects of the transformation on local populations.

For more information about the ILSI Research Foundation, please visit: www.ilsirf.org

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

ILSI RF: Who Will Feed the World’s Cities? The Rural-Urban Convergence (Dr. Jessica Fanzo)
Published on 10 Feb 2017

ILSI Research Foundation Scientific Session 2017
Hungry Cities: The Global Revolution in Food Systems

Dr. Jessica Fanzo, John Hopkins University
Who Will Feed the World’s Cities? The Rural-Urban Convergence

On January 23, 2017, the ILSI Research Foundation organized a scientific session entitled Hungry Cities: The Global Revolution in Food System. The session explored drivers of food choice in low and middle income countries, with presentations from experts who shared their research and perspectives on how we may address this global revolution in food systems. 

Dr. Jessica Fanzo, John Hopkins University, presented on Who Will Feed the World’s Cities? The Rural-Urban Convergence. 

By 2050, 70% of the world’s population will be living in urban areas in search of employment and economic opportunities. Who will feed this exponentially growing population as rural societies begin to slowly disappear? Sixty percent of Africa remains rural and Asia, although rapidly shifting to an urbanized region, has approximately 50% who still live in rural areas. Rural development is an important part of the equation and investments in rural food systems are critical to sustainable development and feeding the world well. In many parts of the world, we are seeing encroachment of cities into peri-urban and rural communities with “ruralized” urban areas and “urbanized” rural landscapes. Although investments are cyclical and the urban-bias often dominates, there are important reasons to invest in rural development and support food hubs and food systems that harness this convergence. First, hunger and undernutrition dominates in rural areas (although also high in many urban slums), thus there is a need to invest in sound food security and nutrition strategies to tackle the burden to ensure that farmer families are healthy. Second, while urban agriculture holds some promise, rural landscapes still produce the majority of food around the world. Third, smallholder farmers have more diversified landscapes and produce approximately 60% of the world’s nutrients, making important contributions to the overall dietary diversity for the world’s population. Fourth, there are many successful examples of how, through better linkages with urban centers, rural development can feed these populated centers while jumpstarting entrepreneurship, empowering women, and sustaining rural livelihoods. This presentation will examine the diet and health consequences of urban migration and rural stagnation, and examples of how rural-urban cooperation can benefit health, economic and sustainable development of populations.

For more information about the ILSI Research Foundation, please visit: www.ilsirf.org

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

Industrial Revolution Notes (Urbanization & the Lives of Workers)
Published on 10 Feb 2017

Write these Industrial Revolution Notes directly on Page 125 of your Notebook.

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

Innovative financing and industry challenges for Sustainable Urbanization, Sunil Kanoria
Published on 14 Mar 2017

Sunil Kanoria, Vice Chairman, SREI Infrastructure Finance & Immediate Past President, ASSOCHAM

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

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