Videos

Video Title
Smart cities MOOC

Smart Cities is a Massive Open Online Course that offers an introduction to the principles of management of smart urban infrastructure systems. It addresses the main challenges in management of Smart Cities during the transition and operation phases in the life-cycle of a Smart City. The course is structured into 5 blocks. In the first three blocks, general principles of management of Smart Urban infrastructures are covered. The last two blocks of the course focus on the management of Smart Urban Energy and Smart Urban Transportation systems as concrete cases.

Source: iglus.org

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

Africities 7: Shaping the Future of Africa with its people (with English & French subtitles)

Africities 7 held in Johannesburg from 29 Nov to 3 Dec 2015, gathered Local Governments and all stakeholders from all Africa and beyond. It was the largest democratic gathering of the continent. www.africities2015.org

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

UrbanARC | Panel Discussion | The 'Periphery' and the future of urbanisation

Urban ‘peripheries’, as sites of social, economic and political transitions are not just linked to delineated urban cores and restricted to edges of existing urban settlements, but also a conceptual lens to analyse new ‘edges’ of urbanity-rurality associated with emergent patterns of urbanization and industrialization in rural locations. In line with theorisations regarding geographies of global modernity posited in world systems theory and dependency theory, the ‘periphery’ also references relational geographies of development associated with the urban and the rural, given current imperatives for urbanization and industrialization.
Moreover, ‘peripheries’ offer an important conceptual tool for displacing, questioning, expanding and ‘othering’ historically linear and territorially isolated analysis and theories of ‘D’evelopment. Conceptual frames based on the idea of ‘peripheries’ have allowed explorations of simultaneous processes of development and underdevelopment, accumulation and dispossession, conflict and collaboration. They have helped situate the ‘core’ into larger systemic frames of ecology, sustainability and crises. They have fostered dissent, critique and alternate imaginations of transformational trajectories. They have questioned the hegemonic boundaries of theory- building and allowed a place for ‘method’ to lead theory and for the marginal to become the foreground of research and analysis.
This panel explores papers on emergent urban futures based on empirical experiences of ‘peripheries’ in India and other non- core locations. Papers may speak to the ‘periphery’ (1) as a site, (2) as a conceptual tool to unpack the edges of urbanity- rurality, and (3) as a positionality to question trajectories of spatial, social and economic transitions associated with a future that will be significantly urban.

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

UrbanARC | Panel Discussion | Relating migration to current and future urbanization
Streamed live on 18 Jan 2017

Chairs/Discussants: Amir Bazaz, Indian Institute for Human Settlements

Migration serves a variety of purposes for those who migrate, such as – risk spreading through livelihood diversification, lower exposure to place-based events such as droughts or floods, and coping with existing shocks and stresses. Particularly in the climate change discourse, it is highlighted that increased environmental stress (exacerbated by anthropogenic climate change) will dramatically increase the number of people migrating, thereby potentially destabilizing regional and global security.
From a climate change perspective, we find that well-being, livelihood strategies, vulnerability reduction and peripheral locations dominate the research landscape on migration in the urban context. Are their additional relational perspectives, and additional frames of enquiry on migration being pursued, which can inform policy development for climate adaptation, as well as urban development in the Global South?

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

Urban Sustainability: The New Business Agenda - Business Assembly at Habitat III

In order to achieve sustainable and resilient urban development, the implementation of the New Urban Agenda requires an unprecedented level of collaboration between all stakeholders, both governmental and non-governmental.

Source: Youtube

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

World Assembly of Local and Regional Governments at Habitat III

On 16th October 2016, on the eve of Habitat III over a thousand mayors and locally elected leaders gathered for the World Assembly of Local and Regional Governments.

Source: Youtube

HP Megatrends

Global socio-economic, demographic and technological forces which HP calls Megatrends will have a sustained and transformative impact on businesses, societies, economies, cultures and our personal lives in unimaginable ways in the years to come. 

In the next 15 years we will experience more change than in all of history to date. Undertsanding Megatrends can help guide how we maneuver this great wave of change, and inform our technology choices of the future, what innovations will be required, and what new business models will be needed.

Source: youtube.com

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

Leading Slum Dwellers around the World to Improve Their Cities

In 2008—for the first time in history—more people were living in urban than in rural areas. Today, more than one billion people live in slums. Founded by a collective of slum dwellers and concerned professionals headed by Jockin Arputham, a community organizer in India, Slum Dwellers International works to have slums recognized as vibrant, resourceful, and dignified communities. SDI organizes slum dwellers to take control of their futures; improve their living conditions; and gain recognition as equal partners with governments and international organizations in the creation of inclusive cities. With programs in nearly 500 cities, including more than 15,000 slum dweller-managed savings groups reaching one million people; 20 agreements with national governments; and nearly 130,000 families who have secured land rights, SDI has been a driving force for change for slum dwellers around the world.

Source: youtube.com

The future of cities

This is a conversation starter first, a video second. I’d love to hear your thoughts on cities, the future, and this project. 

I shared some words, a reading list and featured interviewees here: medium.com/@oscarboyson/the-future-of-cities-ba4e26c807fe#.lrpyoofi4

* Note that the first shot in the movie a "Garbage Truck in Taipei" is actually in Changhua City, also in Taiwan. Thank you Taiwanese friends for pointing this out! 

Thank you to everybody who contributed! Trust me when I say that even if I didn’t get your footage in the cut, we can feel it in the finished product. I want to keep telling urban stories and building on these ideas - hope you do too. Knowledge is Power.

Source: youtube.com

This article is culled from daily press coverage from around the world. It is posted on the Urban Gateway by way of keeping all users informed about matters of interest. The opinion expressed in this article is that of the author and in no way reflects the opinion of UN-Habitat.

What the New Urban Agenda tells us about building inclusive cities

Over a billion people—about 15% of the world’s population—have disabilities. Almost 80% of them live in the developing world, which is undergoing rapid urbanization.

While urbanization brings people closer to new economic and sociocultural opportunities, persons with disabilities still face a range of constraints in many cities, such as inaccessible buildings and public spaces, limited transportation options, inaccessible housing, and barriers in using technology-enabled virtual environments.

These urban constraints have a significant impact on those living with disabilities in terms of mobility, ability to engage in education and skills development, employability and income generation, and larger social and political participation.

Therefore, urban development must acknowledge and plan for the needs of a diverse population which includes persons with disabilities. And there is no better time than now to make that happen. 

The New Urban Agenda for inclusive, livable cities

The “New Urban Agenda” adopted at the Habitat III conference this October offers an unprecedented opportunityfor countries to work toward universal access to city spaces and infrastructure for persons with disabilities and older persons. This builds on the moral and legal imperative for accessibility through the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities—which is celebrating its 10th anniversary—as well as the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Targets under Goal 11 specifically reference affordable housing, accessible transport systems, disaster resilient infrastructure, and universal access to green and public spaces.

Entry points for inclusive urban growth

How can we build inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable cities without leaving behind persons with disabilities? The New Urban Agenda and the SDGs point out several actions to start with:

  • Improving building codes and regulations: Designing universally accessible buildings has proven to be significantly more cost efficientthan retrofitting ones that are not. That’s why urban design and planning should incorporate accessibility into building codes and standards, and universal design and accessibility should be factored into the design phase of any urban development project. In addition, social assessments—including risk analysis, social impacts, and social sustainability—also need to include current gaps and barriers for persons with disabilities across sectors. Launched by GFDRR, the Building Regulation for Resilience initiative seeks to create an enabling environment for accessibility measures, and promotes the idea that building codes and standards must be developed and updated through inclusive, transparent, participatory, and resource efficient. 

  • Building the capacity of policymakers, civil society, and other stakeholders: Capacity development—including providing knowledge and tools—is an important part of implementing the New Urban Agenda. In terms of accessibility, capacity building must target (i) local and national policymakers on understanding and implementing disability-inclusive development, and (ii) persons with disabilities, Disabled Persons’ Organizations (DPOs), and civil society so that they can become effective and informed partners in engaging in consultations with policymakers. Moreover, inclusive development recognizes diversity and aims at involving everybody into the development process. It is crucial to raise awareness and build capacity of architects, designers, engineers, and product developers by integrating universal design and accessibility into degree, diploma, and certification programs.

  • Using information and communication technology (ICT) as an enabler: Technology innovations and ICT-enabled services are playing an instrumental role in shaping urban spaces and urban living. “Smart cities” use digital technologies to deliver improved and efficient public services, use interconnected mobile devices for improved information gathering, and improve relationships between governments and their citizens through new mechanisms for feedback, grievances, and interactions. Accessible digital technologies radically transform how persons with disabilities can communicate and manage information. Adopting accessibility design standards into digital technologies can break barriers to socioeconomic participation, financial inclusion, access to e-governance, disaster management services, civic participation, and community engagement for persons with disabilities. 

  • Respecting cultural diversity and promoting participatory design: Sustainable, universal urban design is local-environment specific, and should be responsive to cultural norms and sensitivities. Local community users—including the disabled and older community members—should be involved in consultations, planning, inspections, and monitoring. Developing sensitivity for the need and benefits of inclusion and generating a sense of ownership on inclusive design will also promote a culture of compliance rather than sole reliance on enforcement mechanisms. While top-down policy reforms, codes, and regulations are essential, cultivating bottom-up participatory processes to realize accessible urban development is key to converting policy into real change.

Source: worldbank.org

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